Houses usually have a reverse of the land boundary, so they cannot be placed close to each other. Setbacks can also allow utility access to buildings and access to electricity meters. In some municipalities, setbacks are based on road rights and not on the front land boundary. Nevertheless, many cities around the world, such as those built in the United States before 1916 and the beginnings of zoning in the United States, have no setbacks. Zoning – and laws relating to site development, such as setbacks for lawns – have recently been criticized by urban planners (especially Jane Jacobs) for the role these laws play in building urban sprawl and low-density car-dependent cities. [Citation required] The notion of dividing country has a corresponding meaning. . . .