This article discusses the impact of a local regulatory mechanism and how using an alternative to New York`s LULUCF process allows local residents to have a voice in the birth of New York City. In the first part of this article, I will look at the traditional actors who have historically shaped regulatory policy in New York and how that policy “makes” the city. In Part II, I will analyze the first CBA in New York and its impact on the level of participation and representation of local interest groups in the case of Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn. In particular, I will look at the criticisms of the project and argue that while CBAs have the ability to advocate for local community interests, they have not been a reliable tool in this particular case in New York. Finally, in Part III, I will say that the case study of the Atlantic Yards megaproject in Brooklyn has important implications for the future of core efforts in cities around the world. Given the trend of increasing foreign investment in cities around the world, a case study from Atlantic Yards can help us better understand and develop a policy framework that can adequately measure and convey the interests of local and international interest groups, both of which today play a role in the creation of cities. This NSOP will protect municipalities from having to settle for business bankruptcies. It will link the Community and the company, so that the company`s revenues will automatically represent money for the Community. According to historians Chudacoff and Smith (2005), the physical “local decay,” visible during the Great Depression, supported the link between the crisis and the cost of physical decay for policymakers. Thus, after the Great Depression, policymakers tried to solve the “problems” of rot and slums that manifested themselves in dense and depressed neighborhoods. These have served as negative economic markers for the decline in the value of real estate, under-utilisation and “an economic burden on the Community” (Weiss, 1980). During this period, urban renewal was considered a public subject. A community meeting for the Atlantic Yards project.

Author photo (2015) The standardized land use authorization procedure in New York is called the uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP). The alternative possibility for developers to obtain project permissions is to enter into a Community Benefits Agreement (CBA) with local CBOs. A CBA is a private contract between the developer and local CBOs. In particular, a CBA document is an agreement in which the developer gets support from the municipality for the project in exchange for the promise to grant certain concessions to the local community, such as access to more jobs, affordable housing, and support for small businesses (for more information on the types of benefits, you can find under CBA`s role in NYC`s land use process). . . .